FREETIMEWEB
E L E C T R O N I C S

IF NOT COMPLETE WITH FRAMES,  CLICK HERE FOR THE FREETIMEWEB SITE

S O N Y /  VIDEO
 

NO LONGER IN COLLECTION, SOLD!
 

TAPES AND LOADING


 

SOURCE: www.lionlmb.org/quad/ format.html

Formats using 3/4 inch (19 mm) wide tape.
Format name:  U-matic                                  SMPTE type:  E
Format type: analog      Scanning system:  2 head helical
Year introduced: 1971 Developer: Sony,JVC,Matsushita Was format sucessful? Y
               [All figures for NTSC, 525/60/2:1, 3.58 MHz  unless noted.]
               [Figures for PAL are for 625/50/2:1, 4.43 MHz subcarier]
PHYSICAL DATA: Tape width: 3/4" (19 mm) Tape speed(s): 3.75 ips, (95.3 mm /sec)
                                                     (Hi band/SP PAL same,
                                                     lo band apparently slower)
       Tape thickness:   1.1 mils       Playing time(s):   1 hour (Large)
                                                        (74 min lo band PAL)
       Cassette dimensions:   7.2" X 4.7" X 1.25" (Small)  20 min (Small)
                              (182 X 122 X 32 mm) 
                              8.7" X 5.4" X 1.2" (Large)
                              (220 X 138 X 30.5 mm)
VIDEO: Track length: 6.74 in.  Track width:  3.35 mils   Track angle: 4.95 deg
                    (171.17 mm)             (.085 mm) (PAL: .07 mm lo band,
                                                        .085 mm hi band/SP)
       Guard band width: 2.05 mil  Headwheel diameter: 4.33"  Speed: 1800 rpm
                  (.052 mm) (PAL: .04 mm hi band/SP)  (110 mm)  (PAL: 1500 rpm)
       Head-to-tape writing speed: 10.26 m/sec. or 410 in/sec.  Gap width:
                                   (PAL: 8.54 m/sec.)
       Head azimuth offset angle (one head):  N/A
       No. of segments: 1    No. of lines/segment:
       Control track width: 23.6 mils (.6 mm)  Recorded waveform: square wave
       --Video modulation or Component luminance channel
       (Conventional)
       Sync tip frequency:   3.8 MHz        Blanking frequency:
       Peak white frequency: 5.4 MHz    Color carrier frequency: 688.373 kHz
                                                                 color under
       (U matic SP)
       Sync tip frequency:                  Blanking frequency:
       Peak white frequency:  7.0 MHz   Color carrier frequency: same as
                                                                 conventional
       (PAL Lo-band)
       Sync tip frequency:                  Blanking frequency:
       Peak white frequency:           Color carrier frequency: 685.991 kHz
                                                                 color under
       (PAL Hi-Band)
       Sync tip frequency:  4.8 MHz         Blanking frequency:
       Peak white frequency:  6.4 MHz   Color carrier frequency: 983.803 kHz
                                                                 color under
       (PAL Hi-Band SP)
       Sync tip frequency:  5.6 MHz         Blanking frequency:
       Peak white frequency:  7.2 MHz   Color carrier frequency: 983.803 kHz
                                                                 color under
       --Component color channel  N/A
       Chroma encoding:
       Sync tip frequency:               Center frequency:
       Negative peak frequency:        Positive peak frequency:
       --Digital only    N/A
       Data encoding system:                        Data rate: 
       Audio segment location:

AUDIO: No. of longitudnal channels:  2     Track width: 31.5 mils (.8 mm)
       No. of AFM channels: N/A     Carrier frequencies:
       No. of digital channels: N/A    Sampling rate:     No. of bits:
TIME CODE: Seperate track, recorded longitudnally over sync info at bottom 
       end of video track. Newest machines also can do VITC.
REMARKS: U matic is the most sucessful professional format of all time. 
       It was developed in the mid '60's as a joint effort between Sony, JVC
       and Matsushita. In any case, the first U-matic machines were aimed at
       the consumer market. Many models featured a built-in tuner. One model
       supposedly included a color TV and a small B/W screen for viewing
       what was being recorded (On another channel?). This forshadowed the
       LV-1901 Betamax/TV console. But, the consumer market was not quite
       ready for home VCR's. Before very long, broadcasters discovered
       U-matic, and the age of electronic news gathering was born. U-matic
       also became very popular in the industrial/institutional markets. The
       SP high band U-matic format gives excellent picture quality, and was
       the most sucessful 'high banding' since quad high band. At it's peak,
       four different manufacturers were building U-matic machines -- more
       than any other professional format! U-matic can now officially be
       considered a dead format, as Sony stopped manufacturing them sometime
       in 2000. Nevertheless, these machines will undoubtedly be in use
       for many years to come.

       U-matic was very sucessfully hi-banded in NTSC countries, creating 
       U-matic SP. In PAL countries, there was apparently an early low and
       high band format. The low band apparently gave extra playing time,
       while the high band was comparable to the NTSC format. SP was
       introduced in PAL as well, but was not real popular. There
       have also been some experimental direct color machines built using
       this format. One of these were built by Recortec, and featured a peak
       white frequency of 10 MHz, double tape speed and triple scanner speed.
       Needless to say, this novel segmented format was a complete failure.
       Another interesting adaption of this format was a 655/24/1:1 machine
       built for the US military. Built from 1973-76, this machine was made
       by Teac for Sony. Unlike the 1" Coniscan machine made for the same scan
       rate, this machine was capable of color. It was essentially a
       ruggedized BVU-100. This same ruggedized model was offered in a
       NTSC/PAL version for use in news choppers. Thanks, Alistar Gutcher for
       getting me to add all the PAL information!
 


© Copyrights Freetimeweb